About

In the 17th century, Miye ou Miye was mostly farmland owned by a number of families. The families of "Abu Nakad" and "Faddoul" owned half of the land and the state owned the rest. In the 18th century, Christians started to move to the village, and the state encouraged the farmers by giving them land to farm. The farmers in return had to pay back 10% of the crops.

In 1875 Victor Guérin found the village to have 400 inhabitants, some Maronites and some Greek Orthodox. In the 19th century, American missionaries came to the village for missionary work. In 1985, the Lebanese Civil War spread to South Lebanon, and the villagers fled for their safety farther south and others went to the capital. From there they started their journey abroad to over 26 countries. The majority went to the United States of America, Canada, and Australia. In August 1991, the Miye ou Miye refugees returned and started rebuilding the village that was destroyed completely.

Today, Miye ou Miye is full of life and it became better than it was before the war. Immigrants, who are living away from their hometown, carried their little town in their hearts along with deep pride of their heritage. This deep love and passion guided them in their daily lives and provided a moral compass

The Miye ou Miye population consists of the following families (listed alphabetically):



In the 17th century,Miye ou Miye was mostly farmland owned by a number of families. The families of "Abu Nakad" and "Faddoul" owned half of the land and the state owned the rest. In the 18th century, Christians started to move to the village, and the state encouraged the farmers by giving them land to farm. The farmers in return had to pay back 10% of the crops.

In 1875 Victor Guérin found the village to have 400 inhabitants, some Maronites and some Greek Orthodox. In the 19th century, American missionaries came to the village for missionary work. In 1985, the Lebanese Civil War spread to South Lebanon, and the villagers fled for their safety farther south and others went to the capital. From there they started their journey abroad to over 26 countries. The majority went to the United States of America, Canada, and Australia. In August 1991, the Miye ou Miye refugees returned and started rebuilding the village that was destroyed completely.

Today, Miye ou Miye is full of life and it became better than it was before the war. Immigrants, who are living away from their hometown, carried their little town in their hearts along with deep pride of their heritage. This deep love and passion guided them in their daily lives and provided a moral compass

The Miye ou Miye population consists of the following families (listed alphabetically):


  • Abdallah
  • Abdo
  • Abdel Aziz
  • Abou Akel
  • Abou Zeid
  • Abu Elia
  • Abu Hamra
  • Al Hanna
  • Amin
  • Ammoury
  • Andraos
  • Asaad
  • Assaf
  • Audi
  • Bou Saba
  • Bou Shaar
  • Chabab
  • Chouweiry
  • Costantin
  • Dagher
  • Daher
  • Daniel
  • Darwish
  • Dib
  • El Saghbini
  • Francis
  • Gerges
  • Haddad
  • Haikal
  • Hanna
  • Hayek
  • Hosni
  • Jabbour
  • Jack
  • Jarjoura
  • Joubran
  • Khalaf
  • Khalil
  • Khawand
  • Khoury
  • Kozhaya
  • Kurban
  • Makhoul
  • Mansour
  • Maroun
  • Matta
  • Moussa
  • Nahed
  • Najem
  • Nawfal
  • Oustfan
  • Rahal
  • Rouzkallah
  • Saikaly
  • Saliba
  • Semaan
  • Shemaly
  • Tiyyar
  • Touma
  • Wakim
  • Wanna
  • Wardy
  • Abdallah
  • Abdo
  • Abdel Aziz
  • Abou Akel
  • Abou Zeid
  • Abu Elia
  • Abu Hamra
  • Al Hanna
  • Amin
  • Ammoury
  • Andraos
  • Asaad
  • Assaf
  • Audi
  • Bou Saba
  • Bou Shaar
  • Chabab
  • Chouweiry
  • Costantin
  • Dagher
  • Daher
  • Daniel
  • Darwish
  • Dib
  • El Saghbini
  • Francis
  • Gerges
  • Haddad
  • Haikal
  • Hanna
  • Hayek
  • Hosni
  • Jabbour
  • Jack
  • Jarjoura
  • Joubran
  • Khalaf
  • Khalil
  • Khawand
  • Khoury
  • Kozhaya
  • Kurban
  • Makhoul
  • Mansour
  • Maroun
  • Matta
  • Moussa
  • Nahed
  • Najem
  • Nawfal
  • Oustfan
  • Rahal
  • Rouzkallah
  • Saikaly
  • Saliba
  • Semaan
  • Shemaly
  • Tiyyar
  • Touma
  • Wakim
  • Wanna
  • Wardy

Miye Ou Miye Municipality

To create Miye ou Miye one of a kind municipality, by preserving its heritage and adapting to modern lifestyle.

Contact Us

Saida, Miye ou Miye, Lebanon
Phone:  +961 (07)722 265
Municipality police (24/24):       
+961 (76) 194 472
Email:    info@miyeoumiye.com
©2018 Miye Ou Miye Municipality.
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